Hoisin beef stirfry

A white rectangular plate shows off a beef and vegetable stirfry meal with a pair of black chopsticks resting on the napkin beneath the plate.I think I posted something very similar to this a while back, but I’m revisiting it. I’ve changed up the ingredients a bit, including the amount of hoisin sauce and spices, as well as adding a can of water chestnuts (which were a fantastic addition!).

Stirfry lunch or dinner is a nearly no-guilt meal for me. So long as I watch the sodium, don’t add much in the way of oil, and am careful with what sauces I add (and how much), I think it’s a pretty healthy way to eat. And loading it up with veggies but just a little bit of meat allows you to spread out a small portion of meat (especially if that’s all you have) between more people/portions.

You see, I’m not much of a raw-veggie fan, but stirfry needs to be crunchy. Warmed through but still undercooked enough to have that crunch. A floppy, mushy stirfry is just nasty, so the key here is a high enough heat to warm quickly while preserving the crunch of the veggies, but not so high that it burns, along with cooking it very quickly. Cooking it on a lower heat just boils or simmers it in whatever you’re cooking it in. I am by no means a master at this. I just kind of eyeball it and judge by how the food feels against the spatula.

So I had some strips of an Eye of Round roast in the freezer that I hadn’t cooked up yet and decided that was going to be the meat of the dish. Here’s what I did…

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Making something coherent out of scraps

Stir fried chicken and veggies on pan-fried noodlesIt happens to us all at some point or another: looking into the fridge is suddenly akin to a train wreck or horror film — truly gruesome but impossible to ignore.

Science experiments and unidentifiable lumps are hidden in every corner and you have to dig through questionable containers and ziplock baggies before you find what you’re looking for.

It could be in the form of one single red pepper just starting to look a little worse for wear, but still edible, if  cooked.That half an onion which is beginning to dry out but would do well if heated up.Oh look, the green onions are starting wilt on the ends, but those can be chopped off and the rest salvaged.

Sounds pretty bleak, doesn’t it?

There’s hope yet!

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Trying something new: linguini with peanut sauce

Strips of teriyaki chicken lean against a bed of long whole wheat noodles tossed with peanut butter sauce, peas and scallionsI’ve actually written an article on the 3Girls.ca site about the Vermont Food and Garden’s Linguini with Peanut Sauce recipe already but loved it  so much that I felt the need to write about it here too. Last week, I was looking for something different. I looked in my cupboards and fridge, seeing the staples I had in stock and thinking, “I don’t want [fill in the blank here] again…” Is it possible? A plethora of  possibilities were laid out before me, and yet they all seemed so ho-hum. Don’t get me wrong; I love spaghetti and meatballs, Shepherd’s pie, and other “old standbys”.  So does my husband!

But I had a hankering for something new. I wanted pasta, but I didn’t want pesto sauce, cheese or tomato sauce. What else was there?

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